26 Training Lessons From 26 Years – The 4 Rules

(Parts One, Two, Three, and Four, in case you missed them)

The following four lessons are what I refer to as my “4 Rules” of training and life. A key part of training all of my athletes is ensuring they learn the 4 Rules, in order, and can recite them at any time…which isn’t too hard because there are only four, they are quite basic, and I am frequently yelling “Don’t break rule number __!” In retrospect, I should have done a countdown style format building up to this post (as these are by far my top lessons), but hindsight is always 20/20.

Training lessons 23-26:

Rule #1 – Don’t Die

Simple enough. If you die, the game is over – it’s pretty tough to come back from that without luck, a defibrillator, or divine power.

How it applies to training: Push yourself, but don’t kill yourself. Remember, sometimes less is more, and more is too much. I’m as big a fan of gut-check workouts as anyone, when they are used in moderation and programmed appropriately.

How it applies to life: Pretty self-explanatory. But in a less literal sense, don’t kill yourself with stress or reckless decisions (smoking, drinking in excess, etc). Live a little, but don’t break Rule #3 (see below).

Rule #2 – Breathe

Another simple rule that most people do without worry for most of their lives.

How it applies to training: It amazes me how frequently people will hold their breath while training until their face turns red and they get light headed. Taking in and holding a deep belly breath is an excellent way of increasing intra-abdominal pressure while handling heavy, heavy weights, but working with 5+ reps is too long to hold your breath. If you’re working with 2-5 reps, take breaths between reps to make sure you don’t end up like this guy (skipping past the horrible deadlift technique).

How it applies to life: Other than a necessity of life, breathing can help control stress and anxiety. A saying I learned a long time ago was “Control your breath, control your mind.” Don’t forget to breathe through the tough times, it will help more than you think.

Rule #3 – Don’t Be Stupid Just Because It’s Easy

As mentioned above, it’s still important to take some risks, have some fun, and do some stupid things from time to time…but for the right reasons. What are the right reasons? If you’re going to be stupid, it better be for one of four reasons: it’s going to be fun, you have a chance to make some money (bet you twenty bucks you can’t _____), you are paying up on a lost bet, or you have a chance to get the girl. You can usually tell when someone was stupid just because they could be by how they tell the story. If it starts with “So this one time, I thought it would be a good idea to…”

How it applies to training: Don’t screw around in the weight room. Don’t try a max without a spotter. Don’t be reckless. There really isn’t a better way to put it than don’t be stupid.

How it applies to life: You’ll have plenty of opportunities to be stupid. Don’t take them all, avoid the unnecessarily dangerous or foolish opportunities. If it’s fun, profitable (not an investment that is just as likely to cost you money), or can get you a date, go for it. You only live once.

Rule #4 – Don’t Suck

An excellent quote describing rule #4 – “If you go outside, meet twenty people, and one’s a jerk, you met a jerk. If you go outside and meet twenty people, and they’re ALL jerks, then you’re the jerk.”

How it applies to training: Hold yourself accountable, be a good teammate, and apply yourself to your training. Don’t act better than everyone else, show up on your own schedule, or disrespect those your sharing the weight room with (rack your weights, don’t go around shouting, clean up after yourself).

How it applies to life: You won’t get very far in life if no one can stand being around you. If a friend asks a favor, don’t turn them down just because it requires you to get off your couch. The more you help and support those in your life, even casual acquaintances, the more likely you are to succeed.

I hope you enjoyed this series and if you have any questions or comments, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

All the best,

Drew Henley, CSCS, USAW, CES
480-241-4112
Drew@HenleySP.com
Twitter.com/DrewBHenley
Facebook.com/HenleySP

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